Nature’s treasure troves in China and France

A file photo shows the view of Sanjiangyuan National Park in China. /CFP

A file photo shows the view of Sanjiangyuan National Park in China. /CFP

Sanjiangyuan, which directly translates to “source of three rivers” in Chinese, is home to the sources of the Yangtze, Yellow and Lancang rivers. China established a national nature reserve in Sanjiangyuan on August 19, 2000. It is the largest of its kind in the country, covering an area of 123,100 square kilometers.

Located on the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, Sanjiangyuan National Park is often regarded as a frigid, barren region. However, the precious water that flows from its many glaciers nurtures a wide variety of wild flora and fauna, from snow leopards and Tibetan blue bears to Tibetan foxes.

An undated photo shows a Tibetan fox at the Sanjiangyuan National Park in China. /CFP

An undated photo shows a Tibetan fox at the Sanjiangyuan National Park in China. /CFP

Home to a variety of rare animals, the nature reserve accommodates 85 species of mammals, 237 species of birds, and 48 species of amphibians, according to its official website.

On the other side of the globe, the Réunion National Park in France is also a natural haven that owes its wealth of landscapes and biodiversity to the wide variety of climates, terrains and soils it encompasses.

An undated photo shows an aerial view of the Réunion National Park in France. /CFP

An undated photo shows an aerial view of the Réunion National Park in France. /CFP

Réunion National Park is located on the island of Réunion, an overseas department located in the western Indian Ocean. Established on 5 March, 2007, the park protects the endemic ecosystems of Les Hauts, the mountainous interior of the island, and covers around 42 percent of the island. Notable among its endemic species are the Réunion cuckoo shrike and the Reunion Island day gecko, reflecting the park’s mission to preserve its unique biodiversity.