Culinary delights: Harbin red sausage and Bavarian Weisswurst

Harbin red sausage has a dry and wrinkled surface. /CFP

Harbin red sausage has a dry and wrinkled surface. /CFP

A dish made from chopped Harbin red sausage. /CFP

A dish made from chopped Harbin red sausage. /CFP

Weisswurst is white and smooth and usually is served with sweet Bavarian mustard. /CFP

Weisswurst is white and smooth and usually is served with sweet Bavarian mustard. /CFP

Various types of sausages are seen on sale at the Nuremberg Christkindlesmarkt in Bavaria, Germany. /CFP

Various types of sausages are seen on sale at the Nuremberg Christkindlesmarkt in Bavaria, Germany. /CFP

Red sausage and white sausage differ not only in color. 

Harbin red sausage, just as its name implies, is a typical smoked product that first gained popularity in northeast China’s Harbin City more than 100 years ago and then became a popular cold cut across China. Made from lean pork, red sausage is smoked over basswood which results in a dry and wrinkled surface. 

White sausage, also known as Weisswurst, is a traditional Bavarian dish made from veal and pork, flavored with onion, parsley, bacon, pepper and lemon, and served with a homemade soft pretzel and sweet Bavarian mustard. Unlike most German sausages, its color is white and its texture is smooth.